Celestial Celeriac

If I’m honest with myself, the title of this has been chosen purely for the alliteration value. ‘Celestial’ may be a splash on the farcical side in relation to a root vegetable. But then again, Celeriac puree is a thing of divine wonder, so maybe I’m onto something!

 

It’s unrealistic my January will be ‘dry’. Unless of course we are talking about the glorious British weather, in which case it will be characteristically damp. No, my Janurary’s are rarely tainted with resolutions of clean eating, calorie controlled diets or total booze bans. I have however, made a resolution of sorts. To cook foods I often look at in the shop, stare blankly at, and then walk on by. In other words, I plan to overcome my phobias of using certain ingredients, as all too often, I base this on their unfortunate appearance. So, last night I got to work creating something with celeriac. A root vegetable that looks part turnip, part ood (Doctor Who reference, I’m sorry). I implore you to try this one for yourself, even if it’s just to make some puree. Divine wonder, I’m telling you. 

 

 

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It’s easy, delicious, and is a good seasonal variation of a classic dish.

 

Serves 5/6

 

Ingredients:

 

For the celeriac elements:

 

1 Celeriac

¼ of a pack of butter

½ a pint of full fat milk

Olive oil (for roasting)

Thyme (fresh if possible)

4 Portobella Mushrooms

Handful of toasted, and roughly chopped hazelnuts (optional)

 

1 Baking tray

1 Blender

1 Pan

Foil

 

For the risotto:

 

1 pack of risotto rice

25g butter

Olive oil

2 cloves of garlic

1 white onion

Glass of white wine

2.5 litres of hot veg stock

Parmesan

 

1 Large pan

1 Medium pan (for stock)

 

CELERIAC ELEMENTS

 

Start of by prepping the Celeriac.

 

Cut of the top and bottom (the bottom bit is the bit that looks like the ood). This helps peeling the vegetable, as you’ll now have a flat surface to work with.

Using a sharp knife, peel the celeriac.

 

Once peeled cut down the middle and place flat side down, so again you have a steady flat surface to work with.

 

With one half, chop into 1-2cm squared pieces (or there abouts – just nice bite-sized chunks), and place on a baking tray that is lined with foil. Season, drizzle with oil and sprinkle on some sprigs of thyme. With a utensil, or your hands, mix this all together, and then cover with foil. It’s good to cover the celeriac chunks with foil, as they take a while to roast, and may burn easily. Leave on 180 for about 30 mins, or until they are soft and cooked through. 5 minutes to the end I took the top layer of foil of, to give them a bit of colour.

In the same roasting tray you could also add portobello mushrooms if you wanted them as a garnish. I put them in their own foil cocoon though.

 

With the other half, also cut into chunks.

In a pan put your butter.

You can simply melt the butter and then add the chunks of celeriac and season. Do this on a mid-high heat, ensuring the butter or celeriac doesn’t burn of course, but that they do get some colour.

If you are feeling fancy, you can melt the butter, but then turn the heat up (before you add the celeriac), to create a buerre noisette. Here you are simply browning the butter too add some more nutty flavours to the butter. Keep the butter on a high heat, ensure it doesn’t burn, then once it has gone a deep golden brown colour, add the celeriac chunks and season.

 

Buerre Noisette or not, once the celeriac is in, cook it in the pan till all the chunks are gorgeous and golden. This should take about 15mins. Remember to stir it as well, so they don’t catch at the bottom.

 

Once the celeriac is golden and caramelised in the pan, turn the heat right down and add the milk. You only need to add enough milk to cover the veg. For me this was about ½ a pint, but this will alter on the size of your pan. Then, staying on a low heat, gently cook the celeriac through. Once the chunks are soft (15 odd mins), it is done and you can turn off the heat. As this is the pureed celeriac, ensure they are pretty soft, as your about to blitz them in a blender.

 

Drain the celeriac chunks but REMEMBER to keep the milk that you cooked them in, so put a sieve/colander over a large bowl, and drain into that. Blend the cooked celeriac pieces in your food processor and season to taste. If the mixture is not smooth or too thick, add a little of the saved milk. Add this until the puree is a smooth consistency.

 

So your celeriac elements are done. Hallelujah. No, it might sound slightly laborious, but I can promise you it’s not.

 

Once these are done, you can crack on making your risotto. You just want to make a classic white risotto.

 

If of course you feel cooked-out, thin the puree out a little using more of the same cooking milk, and you have a banging soup. Top with roasted celeriac pieces and toasted nuts and seeds.

 

RISOTTO

 

Start by softening the onion and garlic in your butter and a healthy glug or two of olive oil on a low heat.

 

Once softened, add the risotto rice and turn up the heat. You can also add a little more oil at this stage if the rice is sticking. Heat/ toast  the rice for a few minutes, (it will begin to go translucent). Keep stirring!

 

Then add your wine and cook down a little to let the alcohol evaporate. Keep stirring!

 

Once done you can then begin by adding the stock. It’s best to keep the stock in pan on a low heat to keep it hot. Slowly ladle by ladle, add the stock to the rice, stir continuously.

 

Once the rice has absorbed the stock, add more. Keep stirring!

 

Keep doing this until the rice is al dente (cooked, but still has a bite to it).

When at this stage, you can add the celeriac puree in the mixture, as well as 2 handfuls of parmesan cheese. Taste for seasoning and add more butter or cheese if you wish here, but the celeriac makes it pretty creamy.

Ensure the rice is nicely cooked through (still slightly al dente), then serve.

 

I served mine with roasted celeriac pieces on  top, roasted portobello mushrooms and toasted and roughly chopped hazelnuts for a little crunch.

 

Serve immediately, and with a bowl of grated parmesan for those who need an extra cheese hit (me) and rocket salad.

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Merci.

 

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Bruton (& At The Chapel)

BRUTON

The Bruton train station immediately plunges you into deepest darkest Somerset. With naïve and simply un-googled views of Bruton being ‘just past Bath’ on the train from Bristol Temple Meads, the hour and a half travel time was quite the shock – but at least we had the Sunday papers to keep us occupied. Although, with a table booked for 4:00, and breakfast fast becoming a distant memory, the abundance of food images in said papers was abhorrent. Hunger fully developed, we set off from the tranquil station into the ‘high street’, past the impressive church with it’s forever chiming bells through the Midsummer town. A town I highly suspect was entirely curated by the National Trust or English Heritage.

My first impression of Bruton was its quaintness and charm. With character rich stone houses, dating from way back when, it really is beautiful to look at. And as if to rub its perfection in our faces, it even has a babbling brook trickling through (River Brue). With gorgeous banks on either side, dotted with wild flowers and looming trees. It reminded me of similar dated towns such as Lewes in terms of the architecture, and eclectic mix of old dilapidated building next to tasteful (and expensive looking) conversions and restorations.

Bruton appears to have heaps of character, in the winding alleys snaking off from the main artery, reminiscent of old villages and towns such at Port Issac yet with the grandeur of Bath. However the second big impression was the vacancy of the place, almost death life silence smothers it save those infernal church bells. Walking along the main streets of one of the the smallest towns in England it is clear it is no ghost town, the odd range rover rolls on through. But many shops are closed, other than the obligatory pub, convenience store and the main restaurant. Walking through the back streets and across the river, we never passed a soul. So if you want to really see Bruton, I’d recommend going for one night. You can spend Saturday relishing in the craft shops and cheese peddlers, and getting a better taste for the retail, food and life it offers, while Sunday you can appreciate the serenity that comes with the holiest day of the week.

And oh! What a food haven it seems to be! Given it WAS a Sunday, many of what I can only hasten to assume are the local delicacies were shut. Matt’s Kitchen, a restaurant right in Matt’s home has a daily changing menu that reads fantastically. Truffles Brasserie looked equally if not more appealing, promising a refined and delicious dinner, while Bruton Wholefoods stores looked like the most authentic and interesting organic store come café that I’ve seen in a while. All of these places within basically 100 metres of each other really reinforced a lasting memory of Bruton as being not ‘foodie’ but tasteful. See ya later chains, there no room for you in this little Somerset idyll.

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I took no other photos other than the roast. Apologies!

AT THE CHAPEL

So as unfortunate as it was that we couldn’t spend more time in Bruton and explore these promising eateries, our table was booked ‘At The Chapel’, and it did not disappoint. As you walk up to the restaurant desk, you are immediately taken aback by the size of the place. Not in square meters, but the height of the ceilings leaves a beautiful and open building. The décor itself is refined and tasteful. It boasts a minimalist tone, with streaks of wilderness and modernism helped along by the gallons of natural light filling the room. It’s mainly white with accents of natural tones, exposed wood and glass leaving an impressive finish. And despite much of the modern art on the walls being rather ‘unimpressive’, the splashes of vibrant colour they give the room are welcome.

The meal itself was delicious. Really super delicious. The English Laverstoke Park Farm buffalo mozzarella was a highlight for me, mainly as a novelty more than anything else. In texture, it was unusual, and unlike it’s Italian counter-part. It was soft, but not gooey, yet still melts in the mouth. Not as good as Italian? Maybe not. But delicious in its own right. Hell yeah.

I’d have to say the best dish was probably the asparagus and poached egg though. In the main part because of the ingenious brassica pesto that accompanied it which lifted the simple asparagus dish to another level, complimenting all the flavors and giving you a different taste to your more run of the mill asparagus expectations. Executed beautifully, it is the best asparagus dish I’ve had in a while.

The roast was also a hit, and one of the best we’ve had in a restaurant for years. With perfectly cooked beef, buttery squash mash, cauliflower cheese, well-cooked and seasoned veg, there wasn’t really anywhere to go wrong. The Westcombe ricotta gnudi was also brilliant, perfect in texture and taste, highlighted by the sage, wild garlic and pea shoots, which adorned it.We drank Picpoul, which worked well with the intense flavours of basil & tomato starter and garlic splattered gnudi, but would have been too sweet with the fish. The house red worked well with the beef.

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We were too full for pudding, but did indulge in some take away treats from the in-house bakery. Their brownies were not as good as mine (ahem), but the lemon drizzle was pretty tasty.  At The Chapel has an in-house bakery and wine shop, which is immediately a win for any self-respecting hotel.

Any qualms? Potentially the unfinished nature of the dishes, in that I was recommended sides with everything that wasn’t the roast. Also the puddings didn’t SOUND delicious enough to order despite already being uncomfortably full, which is saying something. The service was temperamental, which tainted it slightly. And the biggest regret was not trying the pizzas. But i’m just picking holes.

In the immortal words of Arnie, we will be back.

Eating food in France.

So last week I went to France. And after a week back at work i’m feeling rather morose. So I decided to write about it.

Our trip began in Toulouse. It struck me as a grand city, which takes its vibrant food culture seriously. They care and celebrate the amazing produce they use, and really it’s an attitude we in the UK could take some inspiration from. The markets sprawl through main roads, sheltered market halls and ‘très European’ squares. The produce itself ranges from local cheese and wine, charcuterie and meat vendors (lots of fois gras), fruit and veg and endless amounts of fish. In fact, plenty of ‘firsts’ were tried here, from mountain cheese, honey straight from the honeycomb and snails.

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You could spend days here planning out endless meals, nosing through stalls and people watching. The vibrancy and eccentricity is infectious. But there is a moral to the story. Not having our own kitchen here was frustrating. OK, I suppose moral is too grandiose. But it certainly is advise. And this frustration is exaggerated if you have any dietary requirements. The menus are meat orientated in the small bistros (often revolving around foie gras), and often selective. This is usually something I rate, and I do, but it’s no meat//fish//veg options. It’s a duck//foie gras//lamb type arrangement. So you might be just doing a bit more leg work. That’s all.

But onwards to Montpelier we went. Here the food tourism shifted from trawling through markets to inspecting the pocket-sized bars, tapas-eries (yeh that’s a word) and bistros that trickle through the vein-like back streets in the centre.The achingly cool places pepper each corner of the maze streets, which made making a decision that little bit harder. And the diet visibly changed to a more even balance between meat, fish and vegetarian. These were complimented by the large, clean, pedestrianised areas right in the centre.

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We settled with Comptoir Saint Paul for our first meal, situated in the old town, behind St Roche church. The simple and seasonal 3/3/3 menu was initially a good sign. (That, and the beautiful rustic courtyard setting and quiet panic preparation for the busy service ahead.) Busy is good. Not only was each course here pretty tasty, but it was also very… unique. The tuna tartar was one of the nicest things I ate the whole holiday, it really was amazing, well balanced and tuna that just melted in your mouth. The presentation is where the confusion lay. I wouldn’t even know where to start to find a square clear soup bowl with equally dated plates, but it was the balsamic glaze – underneath– the bowl of asparagus soup that really made it. And the idea of just using the same giant purees for each main, and excessive garnish was almost homely. All very charming and forgivable. The wine was also local and delicious. Montpelier is definitely one to visit, and if you’re in the area, try out this place.

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– The view from our table –

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So finally Sète. We loved having a kitchen in here, but given the array of restaurants selling fish along the harbourside combined with the temperamental nature of the markets, it wouldn’t matter either way. But try to stay somewhere with a view. The sea is gorgeous and clear, and waking up to this oh-so-dreamy view really made the stay. That and the patisserie…


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THE harbourside. Right next to our amazing apartment.

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Dodgy photo, but great place. Air b n b at it’s best.

So how did we make the most of the local/seasonal food?

  • Bread from next door, poached eggs and asparagus.
  • Whole boiled globe artichoke, vinaigrette
  • Tuna steak, roast potatoes & tomato salad
  • Loup de mer stuffed with lemon & spring vegetables in white wine/butter sauce.
  • Spaghetti vongole
  • Lots of cheese wine and bread
  • (+ one dinner out at the coolest little fish monger come restaurant, Chez Francois – complete with oyster shucker stall operating all evening) (Side note, cool little place, but the food was actually pretty average… #sorrynotsorry)

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Tuna buying

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Loup de mer

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Oyster shucking stand.

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So cheers to me having a great holiday with a glass of Louis Roederer I guess.

Best of Bristol

This is a round-up of my personal favourite hangouts in Bristol. It is not a comprehensive list in the sense that I have eaten in all places in Bristol, and these are the finalists. But it is in the sense that they are tried and tested delicious. It might be my opinion, but my opinion is usually right, so do what you will with that information. Longer reviews of the more exceptional places are sure to pop up soon. (As well as new recipes I have been trying out).

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—————

Best Breakfast: Bakers and Co. They win this title after a fair amount of deliberation. Rosemarino do the best eggs, but for variety, changing menus, and good coffees, they don’t match up. Baker’s is King (or Queen). An old Instagram video from my personal account highlights this, so I don’t have to. Click here. From sticky buns, to avocado on toast, to monster sandwiches, you’re likely to walk away happy.

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 ^ I mean, their Huevous Rancheros are practically famous… ^

Best Lunch: The Glass Boat wins this for value and location. £10 for 2 or £12 for 3 courses (even on a Saturday), you can’t really go wrong. It has gorgeous views and the internal decor has a touch of dated glamour – in a good way. The service is always friendly and efficient. Best place in Bristol for a lazy lunch.

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^ This is a stock image from their website, but highlights the Bistro style food on offer ^

Best Tapas: Bravas. One of the originals, authentic (it’s recently been closed for the whole staff to go for ‘research’ trip to Spain – i’m in the wrong restaurant), and cheaper than rivals. It’s unpretentious and has crafted a relaxed atmosphere, where you can try every dish on offer or just sit with a glass of wine, picking at one. This is what tapas is meant to be.

Best On-The-GoSt Nicks Market. My favourite is the middle-eastern at the end of the Glass Arcade, Matina. The wraps (homemade kurdish naan breads) there are delicious, everything tastes authentic (i think, i’ve never been to the middle east…). Usually busy at lunch times, but worth the wait.

Best Pub Food. The Bird in Hand. This place is gorgeous English food and all you’d want your local to be. It boasts a refined menu, that’s strictly seasonal and often local. Set in a small pub in the heart of Long Ashton, you can eat exceptional (and beautiful) food, in a informal environment. With a separate bar area, it’s a destination pub and restaurant that’s popular with locals and food lovers alike. And the head chefs a bit of a cutie. (Why not amble through Ashton Court and walk there? Great excuse to indulge in three courses).

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^ Both dishes were from early summer, hence the seasonal accompaniments ^

Best Sunday Lunch. The Lion – hearty comfort food at it’s best. Tucked away in residential Cliftonwood, this one’s a bit of a hidden treasure. It has everything you could want from a Sunday Roast. Good quality ingredients, cooked with love – especially that banging potato dauphinoise. And the vegetarian options (a selection of chef Fiona’s homemade pies) are just a good as the meat options. (And great puddings if you have room).

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One of Fiona’s popular vegetarian roasts, complete with homemade pie. Here we were also making the most of the sun-trap garden. Perfect.

Best Foodie: Wallfish Bistro. It occupies the former Keith Floyd plot on Princess Victoria St in Clifton, where many delicious eateries have been. Consisting of two rooms, one above, one below ground, but opening only the former on quiet nights, it’s a snug little place. The food is french, and often rich, but with corkers like Lobster and Rabbit pie never far from the menu, it’s a bit of a foodie’s favourite. As much as the word ‘foodie’ makes me vomit a little in my mouth.  (The name ‘Wallfish’ derives from the french slang for snails, apparently. A staple of their menu.)

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^ More summer shots of food – apologies. Making the most of the heat on the tables available on the quiet street. ^

Best to impress a visiting friend: The Lido. It’s upstairs restaurant is well reviewed and rated, but quite expensive, unless you get the set lunch or early bird dinner options. It’s also not totally vegetarian/pescetarian friendly up there. However, sit down by the pool and it’s a different story. The tapas is delicious, so go to the cafe, try the scallops and anchovy toast, and you will thank me. Rustic food in an elegant setting.

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^ Not sure who the goof is in the photo *ahem*, but highlights the ‘scene’. I think. I hope. ^

Impress a more-than-friend: Flinty Red. My chosen ‘date’ place. The food here is simple and has a real no-fuss approach to presentation. It’s all delicious, and often dishes, such as the agnolotti featured below, that I had never tried before. On an awkward date, order lots of little dishes, it might help strike up a conversation as things intermittently appear… or maybe it’s just not meant to be. If you are out to impress though, read up a little on what’s on offer, so you can sound like a right know-it-all when you order.


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Dinner with friends: This category is basically somewhere that everyone will enjoy, is fairly priced, and has a friendly and open atmosphere. My choices then are The Souk Kitchen (serving Arabic food) and the Thali Cafe (Indian), for exactly both those reasons. And that they both produce exceptional food.

The: I-can’t-wait-to-try: The Steam Crane. It boasts exceptional craft beers, and aims to be the best Bristol restaurant South of the river; it is certainly one I can’t wait to try. It’s been open since early 2014, so I’m not quite sure why I haven’t been yet. But after a flow of glowing reviews, it’s certainly next on my list. Check out their menu here.

Below is a list of other good places not to be ignored. Because it’s important to support independent local (and often new) restaurants, rather than the big chains.

Pizza: Bosco, Flour & Ash.

Pubs: The Kenny, The Grain Barge, The Portcullis – or any Dawkins Pub, The Pump House (if anything, for the gin), The Rummer (for beers, the giant fire and one particular Indian red wine – not the food…), The Beer Emporium.

Sushi: Bento Boss or Noa.

Ramen: Sticks & Broth.

Best Milkshake: Rocotillos.

Firm faves: The Olive Shed, Birch.

Cafes: Papadeli, Primrose Cafe, Boston Tea Party.

Best for carnivores: Forget Grill Stock, be  better than the Cow Shed. Go to the Ox.

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 ^ Pieminister at St. Nicks. ^

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  ^’The Bosco – at Bosco’ ^

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^ The interior at Sticks & Broth ^
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^ Gelato @ Bosco ^

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^ Three courses @ Birch back on their opening weekend ^

(Small apology about the random photos, I have recently lost my phone, (and so all my recent photos,) so I only have what I took in the summer!!)

Outlaw’s Empire.

— This post got really long. Flick through the pictures and read the summarising sentence at the bottom if you have more important things to do with your day, no one would blame you for that. —

This post has been side-lined for a while, in favour of recipe testing, my job, job hunting and other, less valid procrastination activities. However, the announcement of the latest Michelin guide last week reminded me of my failings as a new blogger, and the desire to document my un-nurtured opinion returned. Why? Because Outlaw’s Fish Kitchen, Port Issac, has been awarded a prestigious star. Hmmm.

I should say now, before I rip this accolade apart, that I’m a massive fan of Nathan Outlaw. The boy’s got talent, serious talent. And it’s a popular opinion to share. But the decision to award his newest establishment a Michelin star, strikes me as odd, misplaced, and highlights the flaws in the system. I fear at this point my boyfriend may accidentally happen upon this blog, read this, and shrink away in embarrassment as I boldly talk about something I honestly know very little about. But I suppose having a wordpress account lets anyone who can type have an opinion, so why not document mine.

Outlaw has a growing Empire down in North Cornwall, and I have had the pleasure of eating at most of them, as well as his restaurant in The Capital. I advise you now not to do what I did, and eat in them all in a confined space of time, as I had very similar dishes at a lot of the places. I would also advise you to not journey to Port Issac in the hope of a replication of Outlaw’s style similar to The Capital or St Enedoc Hotel. The food wasn’t horrible, I mean, c’mon, it is Nathan Outlaw, we gotta give him some credit. But without that name pioneering that little restaurant on the front, there is no way that place would have received a star. No way. Not from what I saw.

The Fish Kitchen is a dainty little eatery, right on the harbour side, situated in a unassuming little fishing cottage. It has been designed well inside, is bright and feels spacious despite the square meters they have on offer. The menu reads well, and are dishes typical to the Outlaw repertoire: cured salmon with horseradish mayonnaise OR smoked mackerel with cucumber, dill and caper salad and crispy oyster etc. When I went for lunch in August, I was taken aback by the value as well. To eat from the set menu, it was only £15 per person (based on 2 sharing), and you were treated to 3 of the small dishes from the regular menu to share, finishing with a heartily sized fish burger and shoestring fries each.

DISCLAIMER: All photos on this post are taken with an iPhone 4 – apologies for the quality – which varies a lot.

First things first, the cods roe dip with flatbread. I have become quite the connoisseur of this, but this take on it didn’t really hit the spot. I have been informed this may be because his is ‘proper’, but I think the smoother, moussier texture is more appealing. This was slightly lumpy, unnecessarily finished with oil, and the taste was a little weak. It was good (value and taste), but I would never put that dish as a starter to a Michelin starred menu. My socks stayed firmly on my feet.

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Cured Salmon and Cod’s Roe Dip (w/ flatbreads – really tasty flatbread)

Next, and featured above was the cured salmon. True to form, this was delicious, but it’s one of my favourite dishes ever, so I’m pretty easy to please when it comes to this. It wasn’t as good as the version I had at The Capital, but it could get a little boring me just arguing ‘it wasn’t as good’, as I feel it might be a critical approach akin to ‘I could do that’ in the art world. Apologies. It already happened. I’m not deleting it.

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Great simple mackerel dish. Shameful unfocused photography.

The smoked mackerel was really good, and it’s a shame I had eaten the same dish done slightly differently 2 days before at St Enedoc Hotel, as the latter was world’s better, and the Fish Kitchen’s one, just didn’t live up to it’s rival.

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Then was THE fish burger. This was by no means a good dish. I can only assume the judges for the Michelin guide decided the set lunch was not something they should be sampling. BUT IT SHOULD BE. Every dish should be impeccable and delicious and you should want to eat it again and again. However, aside from our table, there were audible and visible signs of other diners dislike of this dish. Blitzed up fish, set together in a burger form. Which tasted a old a bit dry and chewy. WHAT? NO! This is not fine dining. It is just a bit rank. Maybe if it has been a breaded fillet of good quality fish, and pulled you nostalgically back to when you used to have fish fingers sandwiches for tea, but in a refined, clever manner, then a fish burger would be apt in this Fish Kitchen. But done in this way, I can’t see where the merit is. Give me Birds Eye over this any day. Bizarre that this relaxed dining experience now has such a sophisticated accolade.

Here’s some food I WOULD recommend, just so you know I do LOVE Outlaw… Ode to Outlaw.

The Mariners Public House, Rock.

Simple delicious food. Not a thing to criticise. Tasty and great service too. (We also had mussels and olives)

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Whole Plaice, cider onions, anchovy & tarragon butter, courgettes.

^ This was incidentally the star of the show ^

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Butterflied Sardines, tomato chutney.

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View for the afternoon.

Outlaw’s at the St.Enedoc Hotel, Rock (not it’s neighbour Restaurant Nathan Outlaw – who do not serve lunch)

BUT, everything, from the view, the food, the wine, the service, was all impeccable. Cannot reccomend this enough, especially if you’re not feeling plush enough to eat at the ‘real deal’ next door… but you’re still feeling a little plush.

Lunch – 3 courses. £45.

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Start: Char-Grilled Octopus, avocado, green olive, lime & rocket – This was the best.

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Start: Cured Mackerel, cucumber, dill, horseradish yoghurt.

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Main: Plaice, hot tartare sauce, crushed minted peas.

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Main: Bass, cider spring onions, tarragon & anchovy butter.

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Pud: Chocolate Cheesecake, raspberry sorbet, raspberry and honeycomb.

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The view. Mmm yes.

Outlaw’s at The Capital Hotel, London. Set Lunch. 3 Courses, £27.

All SO spot on. (Service and food). And it’s all proper fancy given it’s setting.

salmon

Set Menu – Cured Salmon, horseradish yoghurt, saffron kohlrabi & dill.

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Set Menu – Bream, pickled vegetable, smoked paprika sauce.

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Set Menu – Breaded Hake, runner beans, parsley & mussel butter.

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Set Menu – Red Gurnard, broccoli, lettuce, lemon & garlic

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Set Menu – Dark Chocolate Tart, lime ice cream & cocoa syrup

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A la Carte – Poached Peach, honey ice-cream, pistachio & yoghurt

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Coffee and Petit Fours

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Fancy toilets, with swans head golden taps. Cool.

Effectively: Eat at Outlaw’s little empire. Lunch is cheaper, and no less delcious. Don’t make a pilgrimage to Port Issac for the Fish Kitchen, but check it out if you’re in the area. Don’t eat the fish burger.