The Bath Priory

The Bath Priory.

The surroundings for this Michelin awarded restaurant is bold. I mean a retirement home come antiques hoard is an acquired taste. But at least they have stuffy service to match.

It’s not that their target market is retired is really the issue. Why would I care? The age of the diners has no impact on me really, but it does filter through to our experience in a few ways. And it’s less a bad thing, and more of a warning of what to expect.

We had a glass of English sparking wine on the patio over looking the gardens, and this was without a doubt the best part of the experience. It was serene, and the warm summer air, muddled with cool fizz and the faint waft of flowers is enough to make any Brit go weak at the knees. We do love it when our summer comes up trumps. And over looking the croquet lawn, I thought we might have stumbled onto Downton. The house itself is gorgeous, and with a perfectly manicured exterior and gardens, it’s a shame the interior is how it is. The main lounge/study area is nice, and while the artwork is dry and uninteresting, the feel is in keeping with the house’s history. I’m down with that, and it adds to the experience. But the bar area had a catastrophic collection of art, and the restaurant itself, in all its peachy glory, is dull, dated (despite a recent refurb), and doesn’t make the most of the picturesque surroundings.

After some distinctly average amuse bouches ‘on the lawn’, which consisted of cacky hummus, tasty salmon and un-delicious cucumber/apple concoction, we were ushered into the dining room. It was quiet in this plush carpeted room. There was a quiet murmur from neighboring tables, but it seemed exceptionally devoid of any atmosphere. Maybe that’s what they’re paying for. Silence. This stiff ambience is added to and accentuated by the staff. After such a warm welcome and friendly disposition from The Ledbury last month, we were hoping for much the shame. Sadly, despite asking for recommendations on wines and attempting to spark a rapport with the waiters, we were met with flummoxed faces and short answers. It’s a shame, I’m sure they’re lovely people in real life, but it seems working in somewhere with such a strict adherence to some outdated standards means their staff are out of touch and cold.

We had matched wine, and whilst they were tasty, especially the dessert wine that was paired with the vanilla mascarpone parfait, none of them matched the eye-watering price attributed to them. Eating out as we do, and seeing the same wines for three times the price here as say Flinty Red or Bells Diner really reinforces the underlying ethos of The Priory: A lot of money for something you can get elsewhere, for half the price. You’re paying to be ‘there’, and unfortunately ‘there’ isn’t somewhere I’d want to be.

So, other than the expense and the staff, we should spend some time on the food. We had a good tomato soup as an appetizer, which was, yeh, good, fine. And the starters also were good. Actually, the raw mackerel was delicious. A simple dish with caviar, cucumber, radish and horseradish, it was fresh, clean and well balanced. Simple, yes. But pulled off. The Innes goats curd mousse with pinto peppers, dressed with thin croutons and fresh basil was again simple, but again, worked. Nothing wow, but good, and I’d eat this again.

For mains we had saffron linguine, soft poached egg and hake. This was bizaree, and the presentation hindered the dish from gelling. Whilst everything was cooked to perfection (other than a slightly heavily salted bit of fish), it was good. It was just confused, and small. The lamb galette, sweetbread, asparagus, pearl barley and carrot purée was much the same. Disappointment I think is the word.

Pudding was exponentially improved by the banging dessert wine. But as it was, was rather underwhelming. The parfait was good, but the slightly burnt honeycomb hindered the dish, and it was just a bit of a non-event. The soufflé was tasty, but again, just fine. Even the petit fours had their highs and lows. With highs from the chocolate praline truffle and tuilles, and lows from the cheesecake shot glass itself. We’re still undecided about the Turkish delight. The jury is out.

So how would I summaries the experience? The service and interior had no personality, whilst the food was OK. Some courses were great, others off the mark, but nothing stuck out as remarkable, in a good or a bad way. It’s a bloody quick way to blow the best part of £200 though. (Unless you can eat the £27.50 set-lunch, and not have wine or coffees – if you can, you’re a better person than me). For me, it’s all a lot of pomp and circumstance, with no delicious food to fall back on. (Go and have a glass of something sparkling and wander round the lawn though.)

— I decided to include the photos as some of the dishes were pretty, but apologies for the dim lighting and bad quality of the images!!!!! —-

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English Fizz.

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Amuse bouche

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Soup

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Innes goats curd starter

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Mackerel starter

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Lamb main

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Hake main

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Vanilla mascapone parfait pudding

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Passion fruit souffle with coconut sorbet pudding

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Petit fours

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Bruton (& At The Chapel)

BRUTON

The Bruton train station immediately plunges you into deepest darkest Somerset. With naïve and simply un-googled views of Bruton being ‘just past Bath’ on the train from Bristol Temple Meads, the hour and a half travel time was quite the shock – but at least we had the Sunday papers to keep us occupied. Although, with a table booked for 4:00, and breakfast fast becoming a distant memory, the abundance of food images in said papers was abhorrent. Hunger fully developed, we set off from the tranquil station into the ‘high street’, past the impressive church with it’s forever chiming bells through the Midsummer town. A town I highly suspect was entirely curated by the National Trust or English Heritage.

My first impression of Bruton was its quaintness and charm. With character rich stone houses, dating from way back when, it really is beautiful to look at. And as if to rub its perfection in our faces, it even has a babbling brook trickling through (River Brue). With gorgeous banks on either side, dotted with wild flowers and looming trees. It reminded me of similar dated towns such as Lewes in terms of the architecture, and eclectic mix of old dilapidated building next to tasteful (and expensive looking) conversions and restorations.

Bruton appears to have heaps of character, in the winding alleys snaking off from the main artery, reminiscent of old villages and towns such at Port Issac yet with the grandeur of Bath. However the second big impression was the vacancy of the place, almost death life silence smothers it save those infernal church bells. Walking along the main streets of one of the the smallest towns in England it is clear it is no ghost town, the odd range rover rolls on through. But many shops are closed, other than the obligatory pub, convenience store and the main restaurant. Walking through the back streets and across the river, we never passed a soul. So if you want to really see Bruton, I’d recommend going for one night. You can spend Saturday relishing in the craft shops and cheese peddlers, and getting a better taste for the retail, food and life it offers, while Sunday you can appreciate the serenity that comes with the holiest day of the week.

And oh! What a food haven it seems to be! Given it WAS a Sunday, many of what I can only hasten to assume are the local delicacies were shut. Matt’s Kitchen, a restaurant right in Matt’s home has a daily changing menu that reads fantastically. Truffles Brasserie looked equally if not more appealing, promising a refined and delicious dinner, while Bruton Wholefoods stores looked like the most authentic and interesting organic store come café that I’ve seen in a while. All of these places within basically 100 metres of each other really reinforced a lasting memory of Bruton as being not ‘foodie’ but tasteful. See ya later chains, there no room for you in this little Somerset idyll.

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I took no other photos other than the roast. Apologies!

AT THE CHAPEL

So as unfortunate as it was that we couldn’t spend more time in Bruton and explore these promising eateries, our table was booked ‘At The Chapel’, and it did not disappoint. As you walk up to the restaurant desk, you are immediately taken aback by the size of the place. Not in square meters, but the height of the ceilings leaves a beautiful and open building. The décor itself is refined and tasteful. It boasts a minimalist tone, with streaks of wilderness and modernism helped along by the gallons of natural light filling the room. It’s mainly white with accents of natural tones, exposed wood and glass leaving an impressive finish. And despite much of the modern art on the walls being rather ‘unimpressive’, the splashes of vibrant colour they give the room are welcome.

The meal itself was delicious. Really super delicious. The English Laverstoke Park Farm buffalo mozzarella was a highlight for me, mainly as a novelty more than anything else. In texture, it was unusual, and unlike it’s Italian counter-part. It was soft, but not gooey, yet still melts in the mouth. Not as good as Italian? Maybe not. But delicious in its own right. Hell yeah.

I’d have to say the best dish was probably the asparagus and poached egg though. In the main part because of the ingenious brassica pesto that accompanied it which lifted the simple asparagus dish to another level, complimenting all the flavors and giving you a different taste to your more run of the mill asparagus expectations. Executed beautifully, it is the best asparagus dish I’ve had in a while.

The roast was also a hit, and one of the best we’ve had in a restaurant for years. With perfectly cooked beef, buttery squash mash, cauliflower cheese, well-cooked and seasoned veg, there wasn’t really anywhere to go wrong. The Westcombe ricotta gnudi was also brilliant, perfect in texture and taste, highlighted by the sage, wild garlic and pea shoots, which adorned it.We drank Picpoul, which worked well with the intense flavours of basil & tomato starter and garlic splattered gnudi, but would have been too sweet with the fish. The house red worked well with the beef.

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We were too full for pudding, but did indulge in some take away treats from the in-house bakery. Their brownies were not as good as mine (ahem), but the lemon drizzle was pretty tasty.  At The Chapel has an in-house bakery and wine shop, which is immediately a win for any self-respecting hotel.

Any qualms? Potentially the unfinished nature of the dishes, in that I was recommended sides with everything that wasn’t the roast. Also the puddings didn’t SOUND delicious enough to order despite already being uncomfortably full, which is saying something. The service was temperamental, which tainted it slightly. And the biggest regret was not trying the pizzas. But i’m just picking holes.

In the immortal words of Arnie, we will be back.

THE Ledbury

The Ledbury

This week I had the pleasure of eating out in London, lots. Probably too much. So what did I learn during my lavish time off work? Money can buy happiness? A little. A lot more if you like perfectly executed food, brilliantly matched wine, and made to feel like a bit of a Princess. This is what The Ledbury managed. Currently ranked 10th in the world with talented Brett Graham at the pass, the restaurant is keenly seeking renewed confirmation of it’s excellence when the 1-50 places of the World’s Best Restaurants are released soon. And I for one, hope it doesn’t slip.

The Experience

The ever-increasing damage didn’t hinder this experience. For me, this is the most genuine compliment. – The expense did not taint the experience – The front of house team is so friendly and warm, that we were quickly at ease with the stiff tablecloths. The knowledge they effortlessly reeled off was endless, typified in the wine flight (more of that soon). There was never a point when the thought of the bill crossed my mind through the duration, because there was never a time when the service or food could have been faulted. And when you are presented with exceptional food and drink in such a way, it’s less ‘what am I paying for this!?’, and more ‘I’m allowed to eat that!’, followed with warm feelings of honor and joy. Eating in two-star restaurants is a luxury, and there certainly is a high price tag to match at this establishment, but I would recommend it in a heartbeat.

The vacant dress code really does help set the tone here. I mean, I could’ve done without some of louder Ralph Laurens, but you can’t have it all. The ethos from the oft is one of personal comfort of the customer, matching their own interests and tastes. The experience is food centered, and people are excited. You can’t escape the full Michelin service though, which I find testing at the best of times. The number of times I said thank you, was exhausting, almost encouraging me to stop drinking the water so a refill was never required. However, the most futile challenge was making it back from the bathroom fast enough that there was no time for your napkin to be properly folded. Maybe if I stopped guzzling on water, then this challenge would be redundant also.

The benefits of the customer service were showcased with our spot on wine flight. Presented to us were wines I had never had before, so well matched to the dishes, that they were as necessary as the ingredients themselves. This worked from the Buffalo curd miso style soup paired with a punch-packing PX grape wine right through to the olive oil cake dessert with a Muscat pairing which really felt like an extension of the dish itself. The audible excitement from the well-to-do neighbors on the right on being treated to a glass of wine from their favorite area in France, whilst the table on the left were gifted an extra course which they had been eying up, illustrates this.

The place oozes with refinement (can refinement ooze), and expectation. The setting is unassuming, and as with many high-end restaurants, the décor is tasteless in its mediocrity. It might leave room to appreciate the modern cuisine, but a smear of personality might be nice. Following from this minor negative, the scallop dish was slightly over cooked to the point of them being really chewy. This disappoint does mean my favored scallops (everyone has these right?), are the one from The Lido, sorry Brett!!

The Food

 Let’s get to the best bit. The highlights for me were the oyster cream, raw sea bream, caviar, cucumber and frozen English wasabi. This dish, sounds like something I wouldn’t particularly order, but the way the flavors, textures and temperatures bounced off each other, to create something not only wholly delicious, but cleansing and fresh was really amazing. And that oyster cream was ‘summin else. The next thing to blow me away was the lobster dish, largely for the size of lobster claw presented to me, but also the exquisite plating and on point cooking. And lastly, was the final dish, the pave of chocolate. All the puddings were amazing, and it’s a tough one between this and the pre-dessert strawberry bowl of amazing-ness. But chocolate is my kryptonite, so it was an easy win in the end, and this was unbelievably smooth and chocolaty, perfectly accentuated by the () ice-cream and matched desert wine (which I’m afraid to say I was paying less attention to at this stage).

My big regret is booking transport for 16:00, when we sat at 12:00. We had time for a tasting menu, plus coffees, but unfortunately had to rush off before we could take them up on the tour of the kitchen we were offered. I’m going to hold you to that though, and can’t wait for next time.

Duration: 3hrs 25mins

Price per person: £180

THE PESCETARIAN TASTING

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Smoked mussel and squid ink cracker (left), goats cheese puff with black truffle (right)

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Brioche and cauliflower

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Oyster chantilly, tartare of sea bream and frozen english wasabi (with cucumber and caviar)

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Mackerel, flame grilled and raw, with pickled cucumber, Celtic mustard and Shiso.

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Buffalo curd with onion, peas and broth. & a black truffle rarebit accompaniment


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Scallop, cauliflower.


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Lobster claw, shittake mushrooms, cauliflower.


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Turbot, asparagus (white & green), olives

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English strawberries (pre-dessert)   11208781_10155687138710360_1909931725_n   Olive oil cake, blood orange, white chocolate & tea

11330493_10155687138550360_706383213_nPave of chocolate, vanilla and clementine leaf ice cream

Hangover hangouts

 Hangover hangouts, haunts, hotspots and help.

Here are my top 12 places in Bristol to cure your hangover. As we all know from Buzzfeed, hangovers come in all shapes and sizes, so there is no one-size fits all. But with this careful selection of establishments, you can be sure to find the one that’s fits your current mood.

NB – I will predominantly be using photos directly from the websites, unless stated.

  1.  The Guilt

Waking up spooning a tequila bottle and the remains of what looks like a king-size kebab? All you can conclude is that you really did abuse your poor body last night. The guilt has kicked in. We’ve all been there. Right…? You need somewhere that will cleanse you. Big Banana Juice Bar in St Nicks  is the place for you. Juice is all that’s going to get you through this dark place.

  1. The Indulgent

It’s the weekend (probably – I mean, who knows at this stage), so treat yo’ self. Yeh, you feel like death, but who cares, you deserve the best, and if you’re out brunching, it may as well be in style. You were on such great form last night that a treat is probably deserved. Bakers and Co. is the place for you.

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  1. The Panic

Much like hangover 1, but minus the guilt. The flashbacks from the night before have started and you need to block out the pain. Ignoring any advice about the benefits of juicing, you acknowledge your bodies requests for more grease. (Somehow the 5am kebab didn’t quite hit the stop). You need Rocotillos. Their milkshakes will stop your shakes. Everyone knows about the beneficial properties bananas and ice cream have on a hangover.

  1. The Mixed Bag

It was a big night last night, and it looks like you lent your front room to most of Mbargo. Boston Tea Party will cater for large(ISH) groups who have a variety of hangover issues. From fry-ups to smoothies, burgers to granola, everyone will find what they need. And it’s pretty tasty there an all. (And there are a few locations to choose from).

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  1. The Fancy

Want to just sit in the sun (*ahem* overcast *ahem*) with massive sunglasses and not stick out? The Primrose Café is for you. With an abundance of outdoor seating and many rocking their oversized eye-wear, it’s a good place if you want to sit under the pretense of being fancy, but the reality of possibly looking like someone out of the ring.

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  1. The Intelligent

Don’t get me wrong, it doesn’t mean you’re having an intelligent hangover. I’m not sure that’s a thing. And you’ve made any number of mistakes the night before, but now you’re thinking straight and making the right decisions. And that’s Katie and Kim’s. I’m not sure what hangover it will cure, but its so dam tasty, I couldn’t leave it off this list. Full review here.

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^My own photo^

  1. The Catastrophe

Who knows whats going on. You’re reaching for the phone. The curtains aren’t being opened for a long while and the idea of making yourself presentable to the outside world is one of the worst ideas anyone has ever had. Planet Pizza will sort you out. (A rare decent home delivery takeaway in Bristol).

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  1. The Adventurer

Magic. You’ve woken up feeling alright. The hangover is manageable, so you can probably stomach something that isn’t a fry up or cheerios. The Soukitchen will sort you out. With a good variety on their brunch and lunch menu, you can branch out a little. And they have a great soft drink collection that will hydrate you in style.

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 ^ Both my own photos ^

  1. The Denier

Friday night is a blur but you’ve woken up on Saturday feeling pretty cocky. You openly deny any hangover, because you’re just that ‘ard, and suggest the pub. It might be 10am, but the craic waits for no man. The Kenny is the place for you. Beers and a full English. That’s how we should be dealing with Saturdays.

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Unrelated crab from their website. Although whole crab is currently on the menu…

  1. The Fixer-Upper

Need a warm hug? The Bristolian is the place for you! The lovely homely menu has a great selection of brunch options, from meat to vegan fry ups. All set in a lovely neighborhood café full of warmth and loveliness.

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  1. Maybe It’s Not So Bad

Rosemarinos, as I have already claimed, do some of the best eggs in Bristol. So if you think you can handle the slightly more sophisticated atmosphere than some of the other options here, then I recommend it highly. And they do a banger of a bloody mary.

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^ My own photo of their bloody mary ^

Places of prestigious brunches:

Wallfish Bistro, Bills, Café Kino, No. 12 Easton, Harts Bakery. (- I would especailly recommend Harts when a ‘quick getaway’ is required, and you have to leave the city at a moments notice the morning after the night before. This little gem is hidden near Temple Meads).

Oh, and here’s a cornflake milkshake from some hidden gem along the riverside….

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Blunos.

This post has encountered a few hitches along the way.

Number One: It is about 4 months tarde.

Number Two: I lost my phone for 2 months in-between eating and writing this post, so the photos have since been lost. iCloud conspired against me and all. So you’ll have to use your imagination for this post. Which is tiresome, I know.

Fear not though, as I did write this the old fashioned way on the train home from bath when I did make the trip to Blunos, so the words are as fresh as the fish we were served. So here’s my take on Blunos: From Water to Waiter (in a matter of hours).

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Given the proximity of Bath to Bristol, it’s  trip I often make, but the food scene there has always seemed slightly disheartening. This is a mix of unfortunate experiences at the places that make the food headlines there, such as Chequers, but equally my own lack of insider knowledge. Blunos however, has shown me the light. Maybe it’s the magnificent moustache on the 90’s cooking star that lured me to his new establishment, or the whispers of greatness that drifted around it’s opening. Whatever it was, a rare saturday off combined with some crisp October sunshine meant and trip to Bath was on the cards and Blunos was quickly booked. Sunshine which once inside Blunos was sadly quite elusive.

Blunos is slightly off the beaten track, which is bonus for me, as it meant I could explore and escape the crowds which I often associate with weekends in the historic city. The restaurant itself though is rather bizarre. With few indications of the best way to get there, we wandered through the car park of the hotel it is within, past some aluminium garden furniture strewn across a paved area… Where we then found a ‘tunnel’ style entrance, taking us away from the stunning view, into a window-less room. The lack of natural sun-light and dedication to synthetic materials and colours was somewhat frustrating in a restaurant that prides itself on fresh fish and local produce. Any indications of it being in Bath were absent, and you could easily be inside a dodgy London establishment that self confesses itself as ‘modern’ or ‘metropolitian’. The lurid orange and lime with metallic highlights combined with school white board with today’s special all combines to create something unimpressive.

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Photo credit: Left: Western Daily Press, Right: Trip Advisor

Let’s skip along to the food…

To start, well, it started excellently, with the moustached man himself presenting us with wafter thin bread crisps and mackerel pate, as well as a whole mini loaf of crusty bread (complete with engraved heafty bread knife). So as far as starters go, those which combine free things, and the appearance of 90s star chefs, are usually some of the better.

To start properly I had D.I.Y smoked salmon Bellinis. With the perfect little rounds of Bellini tucked in a warn napkin bed. Shallots and capers to sprinkle, cream cheese to spread. Yes. This was The One. And, MASSIVE. OK, so the A’la Carte isn’t cheap by any means, but we weren’t given any ‘delicate’ portions. We were given real sized amounts.

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Speedy impression of the starter – to get an idea of the size and cute-ness. Does it come through?

We both had perfectly cooked fish (Salmon and Monkfish). Both dishes were simple but executed brilliantly and to an extremely high standard.

I know i’m skipping over the mains, but how our meal started and ended made it so notable. (Other than the general great food.) And this meal ended with a Signature Egg. A fun, creamy and fruity end to the meal. The sweet cinnamon ‘toast’ soldiers and ‘pepper’ completed this. And managed the impressive task of being stylish and silly at the same time. This is usually given to guests as a pre-dessert, so fear not if you don’t see it on the menu.

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This photo got saved in iCloud-gate…

Maybe I shouldn’t focus too much on interior design. But no matter how great the food is, it should be remembered that you have to sit in their for the whole meal, even when there isn’t food there to distract you. So make it somewhere people want to sit, and want to come back to. Oh but come back I would. Despite it’s resonably high price tag, it was delicious, so yes, I would. I’d make the trip to Bath again and again for this hidden gem. But I’d sit in the car-park.

Katie and Kim’s

Here’s a quick one about a new found love this February…

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Katie and Kim’s, (as much as it might not want to be,) is an advertisement for why you’d probably rather live in Montpelier. The laid back and communal feel to the space (instilled by the large, bare wooden table, which dominates the room and invites you to touch elbows with strangers (future friends…?), is what you really want from your brunch. There’s a limit to how often you can eat Eggs Benedict with over priced pressed apple juice on a small trestle table in Clifton Village and enjoy it. Especially in February. The stripped back feel of the place denies any space for pretentious-ness, and the eclectic teapots, cutlery and crockery you’ll be given adds a warmth to the whole experience. What truly makes it though, is the ladies behind this little café, Katie and Kim themselves. Open, chatty, helpful and super duper nicer, these are tops babes you’ll wanna be mates with. But failing that, you can just hang out in their kitchen. Katie and Kim have an informal setting, complete with informal paraphernalia, swing doors to next doors farm shop, and absolutely delicious food. It’s the real deal and I think I’d quite like to move in.

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To start we had cheese and rosemary scones, butter. Served on a wooden plate. It may look unassuming, and slightly burnt. It was in fact, scone perfection. And everyone should try one. There’s the option of adding poached eggs or bacon, but I’d highly recommend au-naturel.

We had hoped for some of their famous custard tarts, but in the agonising queue to order, I saw the last three cruelly snatched before my eyes. So next time, I’m turning up early. Someone play their tiny violin.

We then had cauliflower and keens cheddar tart, with greens and some sweet mustard wizardry. It was delicious, and hearty. We had 2 for £6. As was the growing theme of Katie and Kim’s, it looked very much home-made, but the flavours were bang on, despite the comfort food style.

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Finally, and despite already being full, we shared poached eggs, greens, smoked salmon and aioli on sour-dough. Also good. Also worth a try.eggs kakims

Katie and Kim’s

Here’s a quick one about a new found love this February…

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Katie and Kim’s, (as much as it might not want to be,) is an advertisement for why you’d probably rather live in Montpelier. The laid back and communal feel to the space (instilled by the large, bare wooden table, which dominates the room and invites you to touch elbows with strangers (future friends…?), is what you really want from your brunch. There’s a limit to how often you can eat Eggs Benedict with over priced pressed apple juice on a small trestle table in Clifton Village and enjoy it. Especially in February. The stripped back feel of the place denies any space for pretentious-ness, and the eclectic teapots, cutlery and crockery you’ll be given adds a warmth to the whole experience. What truly makes it though, is the ladies behind this little café, Katie and Kim themselves. Open, chatty, helpful and super duper nicer, these are tops babes you’ll wanna be mates with. But failing that, you can just hang out in their kitchen. Katie and Kim have an informal setting, complete with informal paraphernalia, swing doors to next doors farm shop, and absolutely delicious food. It’s the real deal and I think I’d quite like to move in.

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To start we had cheese and rosemary scones, butter. Served on a wooden plate. It may look unassuming, and slightly burnt. It was in fact, scone perfection. And everyone should try one. There’s the option of adding poached eggs or bacon, but I’d highly recommend au-naturel.

We had hoped for some of their famous custard tarts, but in the agonising queue to order, I saw the last three cruelly snatched before my eyes. So next time, I’m turning up early. Someone play their tiny violin.

We then had cauliflower and keens cheddar tart, with greens and some sweet mustard wizardry. It was delicious, and hearty. We had 2 for £6. As was the growing theme of Katie and Kim’s, it looked very much home-made, but the flavours were bang on, despite the comfort food style.

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Finally, and despite already being full, we shared poached eggs, greens, smoked salmon and aioli on sour-dough. Also good. Also worth a try.

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